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#41
Im from Durban in south africa in a mostly indian residential area and here we have the legend of highway sheila 😄 ..



Sheila is described as being a beautiful indian female with long black hair and has been haunting the Higginson highway for decades now . This highway in a place called Chatsworth is notoriously dubbed death highway for the amounts of deaths on it,
and suspiciously on said highway we have A cemetary.
Plenty have claimed to have seen Sheila dressed all in white just gliding along the road or sometimes hitchhiking ..

It is said Sheila was gang raped and murdered on the highway.
Due to her untimely death, Sheila took to haunting the highway in revenge of the people who killed her and mostly to find her way home..


A popular story involved a young man who had stopped to pick up a female hitchhiker. The man offered to take her home, and noticed the temperature in his car drop when the woman entered the car. He offered the girl his coat.

They drove for a short distance and she gave him an address to drop her off at and introduced herself as Sheila. When they got to the house she got off and was handing him his jacket but he told her he would return for it some other time as it was late and cold and sheila was still outside in the yard , he drove off before she entered her home . The following he drove back to the house to get his jacket , as he knocked on the door a middle-aged woman answered the door and the man asked for Sheila.



"The woman wasnt surprised as many had come knocking at the door asking for Sheila , 'but she replied She does not live here any more'. The young man told her he had dropped her off the night before and the woman said it was impossible, as Sheila had died years ago.

"She told the man to go to the cemetery if he didnt believe and shut the door .. Not entirely believing what the woman had said , he decided to drive to the cemetery... As he stood within the cemetary he spotted his jacket hanging on a tombstone and walked to ward it .. On the gravestone said Sheila gone too soon ... RIP
2018-12-08 19.57.12.jpg
 
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#42
Im from Durban in south africa in a mostly indian residential area and here we have the legend of highway sheila 😄 ..



Sheila is described as being a beautiful indian female with long black hair and has been haunting the Higginson highway for decades now . This highway in a place called Chatsworth is notoriously dubbed death highway for the amounts of deaths on it,
and suspiciously on said highway we have A cemetary.
Plenty have claimed to have seen Sheila dressed all in white just gliding along the road or sometimes hitchhiking ..

It is said Sheila was gang raped and murdered on the highway.
Due to her untimely death, Sheila took to haunting the highway in revenge of the people who killed her and mostly to find her way home..


A popular story involved a young man who had stopped to pick up a female hitchhiker. The man offered to take her home, and noticed the temperature in his car drop when the woman entered the car. He offered the girl his coat.

They drove for a short distance and she gave him an address to drop her off at and introduced herself as Sheila. When they got to the house she got off and was handing him his jacket but he told her he would return for it some other time as it was late and cold and sheila was still outside in the yard , he drove off before she entered her home . The following he drove back to the house to get his jacket , as he knocked on the door a middle-aged woman answered the door and the man asked for Sheila.



"The woman wasnt surprised as many had come knocking at the door asking for Sheila , 'but she replied She does not live here any more'. The young man told her he had dropped her off the night before and the woman said it was impossible, as Sheila had died years ago.

"She told the man to go to the cemetery if he didnt believe and shut the door .. Not entirely believing what the woman had said , he decided to drive to the cemetery... As he stood within the cemetary he spotted his jacket hanging on a tombstone and walked to ward it .. On the gravestone said Sheila gone too soon ... RIP View attachment 15807
.....Wow, its remind me of a old horror film in Indonesia that played by Suzzana.....only in there she haunt, torture before killed the guys that has raped and murder her one by one......gruesomely.
 
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#43
TOKOLOSHE

The Tokoloshe, Tikoloshe or Tokolos (in slang) is a dwarf-like creature of Xhosa and Zulu mythology that is said to be conjured up by sangomas (traditional healers) usually out of jealousy or anger. It is said to wander around causing mischief and scaring children. As with the Western counterpart called “the bogeyman”, parents will often warn naughty children that if they don’t listen to them, the Tokoloshe will get them.


"One story of the tokoloshe originates from a few hundred years ago, when an extremely naughty boy in a rural village was said to have caused trouble with the village’s traditional leader. In order to stop the boy’s disobedient behaviour, the leader led him down to the beach, where he threw salt at the boy. This is said to have turned the boy into the ugliest creature imaginable, but made him angry and naughtier, until eventually the villagers had no choice but to kill him. Another one is that tokoloshe is a very short thing more a dwarf who appears on little kids it has long nails with rag cloths and will ask you for Amaas if you don’t give it; it will give you a smack across your face.”


Some Zulu people (and other southern African tribes) are still superstitious when it comes to things like the supposedly fictional tokoloshe--a hairy creature created by a wizard to harm his enemies (also … known to rape women and bite off sleeping people’s toes)."

It's the most feared African demon; the African people are really superstitious. It's just a little black hairy thing, a little man with a big fat stomach. He's really terrifying and comes out at nighttime and he's got private parts as big as a horse's. And African ladies explained to us that if they're having a wet dream, it actually means that the Tokoloshe is boning them in their sleep and their husband will never be able to satisfy them again because of the Tokoloshe's mega-genitals. That's why if you go into the ghetto now a lot of African women have their beds on top of piled-up bricks.

Also, you can put a curse on someone in Africa by getting a witch doctor to send them a Tokoloshe. The witch doctor mixes medicine and blood and herbs and then pours this mixture over a Tokoloshe voodoo doll. And the voodoo doll will come to life and the witch doctor can command it to come to their house and mess it all up. A Tokoloshe can ruin your financial situation or make you divorce your wife. Another thing that people can do to make a Tokoloshe-- and they do this in the ghettos in South Africa--
2018-12-09 13.43.07.png
 
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#46
TOKOLOSHE
part 2



*Stumbled across this on an old newspaper and felt like sharing*

Gay Tokoloshe Terror” from 2012. It was the paper’s first report of a gay tokoloshe and was very well read.


Picture: Sizwe Sikhakhane
He has the poster framed in his office.

“This guy was talking about how every night a gay tokoloshe wanted to get busy with him.

“The tokoloshe was very well endowed so the man was desperate to get rid of it. I met the man and he was very traumatised.”

The twerking tokoloshe was also a big hit with readers.


Picture: Sizwe Sikhakhane
The creature started twerking when the provocative dance went mainstream a few years ago.

Moalusi also remembers how in 2012 the SA Police Service said they were going to set up a special unit to focus on the occult, including tokoloshe incidents.


Picture: Sizwe Sikhakhane
Many people said it was the Daily Sun’s reporting that spurred on the cops to focus on the creature.

Other well-received pieces included “Tokoloshe Tracker in my Bum”, and a piece about an umlungu tokoloshe, the first white tokoloshe.
 
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#47
And here i am, late for another holiday theme stories....oh well. Cue the intro!
.......
....
He sees you when you’re sleeping, he knows when you’re awake, he knows if you’ve been bad or good so be good for goodness sake! No, I don’t mean Santa, I mean his alter ego Krampus (Looks like i'm are not the only one with multiple personally disorder, am i right?). *ehem* a popular Christmas tradition in European countries such as southern Germany, Austria, Hungary and the Czech Republic. And trust me; you don’t want to make his naughty list!
With origins beginning in Norse mythology, Krampus was once believed to be the son of Hel, ruler of the Norse underworld.

In the 17th century, Krampus was tied to Christian celebrations, and paired with St. Nicholas. Legends say that he joined St. Nicholas on his treks the night before St. Nicholas’ feast.
While St. Nicholas would reward the good with gifts and treats, Krampus would punish the bad. In some cases, he would leave coal, but darker tales tell of ill-behaved children being stuffed into his sack to be carried away to hell.

His appearance is befitting of a demon. Dark matted fur with cloven hooves and large horns. His tongue is long and pointed and his teeth are sharp fangs. He is described as carrying chains or ruten, bundles of birch branches, to hit bad children with. Other times he is depicted with his sack, or even a washtub, which he uses to carry naughty children to the underworld where he will later torture and possibly even eat them.

Despite his pre-Christian origins, the legend of Krampus is still very much alive today. The night (December 5th) preceding St. Nicholas’ feast is nowadays known as Krampushnacht or Krampus Night. On this day the young men of the Alpine area dress up and wander through the streets with bells clanging to signify their approach, ready to chase children (and sometimes curious tourists) with their chains and whips.

In the United States, Krampus has crept his way into pop culture with the hit T.V. series, Grimm. In 2013 the beast was featured in, The 12 Days of Krampus. In L.A. and all across the states we are seeing Krampus events pop up . A bit behind the trend I’d say. It makes me wonder, “will I be seeing Krampus cards in Target in 10 years?”.

The legend of Krampus is so weird that people can’t helps but to be fascinated by it. I’ll be honest, it’s even a little hard to look at, and would surely make my mother cringe. I can’t imagine how something so gnarly and twisted can be part of a holiday that’s so warm and fuzzy. But that’s what makes my job interesting. And as long as there are cool legends to be explored, I’ll be right there in the mix.....did that sound to ominous?
......
....
You might not be asking yourself, “who is Krampus?” but instead telling yourself, “I better behave”. So the next time you hear a distant jingle on a cold December night, don’t be so quick to assume it’s good ol’ St. Nick. It just may be Krampus coming to drag you to hell.....or slap you with a broomstick, thats works too.
....
....
MV5BMTAzMDQxNzg2MDJeQTJeQWpwZ15BbWU4MDMzMDEwODEx._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,705,1000_AL_.jpg

Ps. Pretty good movie he got there.
 
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#48
"Balete Drive" was named after a gargantuan balete tree that used to stand in the middle of the road. The road, although the exact construction date is unknown, had been cemented and asphalted and became a main thoroughfare during day and night the whole project road construction was finished on 1970 and finish 1971 almost a year.

"Balete Drive Nasty history"
Most of the legends describe a white lady ghost, a popular character in the Philippine folklore, who is supposedly haunting taxi drivers "for eternity". According to legend, the ghost is a teenage girl who was run over and killed by a taxi driver at night, then buried around a Balete tree in Balete Drive.One variation of the legend claims a student at the University of the Philippines was sexually assaulted and killed by a taxi driver, and her spirit roams the street looking for her murderer. Another version of the story claims that a female resident of one of the ancestral mansions lining Balete Drive was abused and killed by her own family, and her spirit haunts the road, seeking help from passing drivers. According to local rumor, the legend of Balete Drive was "fabricated by a reporter in the 1953 in order to come up with an interesting story".
 
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#49
Woah.... I almost forgot that this thread exist, thanks to Mr. @pleaseforgiveme to reminded me!
Alright, let's see my list.... Pocong? Nah... Kuntilanak? Been there, Kuyang?...hmm not yet....aha! Here it is. Alright *Cough*
....
Do YoU WanT TO plaY a gaME?.....
...


Jelangkung, also called Jailangkung, is an Indonesian game used to communicate with spirits that's more than 1,500 years old.

The game works like this: You draw a circle on a piece of paper, about 20 centimeters in diameter, the write the letters of the alphabet along the rim. You then hold the pen or pencil with the point in the center of the circle. At least two people hold the writing instrument at one time (you can't play this game alone) while another recites the incantation. The specific mantra differs from region to region, but usually goes something like this:

"Jelangkung, Jelangsat, di sini ada pesta, pesta kecil-kecilan. Jelangkung, Jelangsat, datang tak diundang, pulang tak diantar."

In English:

Jelangkung jelangsat, we have a party here, a small party. Jelangkung jelangsat, come uninvited, go undelivered.

Once you feel the spirit arrive, you ask your question and wait for it to move the pen around the letters to spell out an answer.

Traditionally the game was played with a doll made from a coconut shell water dipper and a wooden handle, dressed in human clothes and with a key pendant hung around its neck. At least two people hold the doll while the writing instrument is tied to its hands. The spirit would then occupy the doll.

14-32-41-Jailangkung.JPG

Hey look! It's Chucky's Grandpa!


History....
Jelangkung was first mentioned in an ancient manuscript from the fifth century, which explains exactly the same rules for playing that are used today in Indonesia.

It can be played anywhere but it is most popular in haunted places and around sunset. In the past, people would play on the night of a full moon.

Once the spirit arrived, it would introduce itself and start telling stories.

People would ask questions, such as the name of the spirit, when or how did it died and sometimes about the future or lucky number in gambling.

Origins....
The name Jelangkung comes from an old Chinese belief of the Gods Poyang and Moyang (similarly pronounced with Indonesian term nenek moyang, which means ‘the ancestors’), Cay Lan Gong (literally translated as God of the Vegetable Basket) and Cay Lan Tse (God Protector of the Kids). The game was played by children on the Moon, or Mid-Autumn, festival.

They called on the Gods Poyang and Moyang to enter a vegetable basket doll (used before the water dipper). In the doll’s hand a writing implement, usually chalk, would be inserted. On its neck was hung a necklace with a key pendant. The children would light incense and recite the mantra and when the doll got heavier they knew the spirit had arrived. The doll would nod if it agreed to be questioned and would spell out its answer on a chalkboard.

Before a doll was used, Jelangkung was called Fu Ji, and was played with a tree branch shaped like a “Y”. On person would hold each end of the fork other end would write the answer in sand.

The tradition is closely related to Taoism, in which prophesies are part of daily life.

Versions....
There are plenty of variations of this game!

Cay Lan Gong might have disappeared in China, but the tradition was adapted, passed on and spread wide all over Indonesia. In Java, it is known as Nini Thowong orNini Thowok.

Its ritual is used by adults as well as kids to help protect their village from bad spirits. They would use a compass (as in the geometry tool) and a scarecrow.

In West Sumatra, the Minangkabau people play Lukah Gilo as a form of public entertainment. A shaman called Dukun Lukah directs the ritual as a play and up to four persons have to hold the doll, which is referred to as Lukah Gilo. Lukah is a tool used to capture river fish made out of plaited bamboo and shaped like a vase, and refers to the holders. Gilo means crazy. A basket is used as the doll, with wooden or bamboo hands and a pumpkin or coconut shell head. It is dressed up like a woman.

The dukun recites the mantra over the lukah and it starts to move erraticly. The more the incantation is repeated, the wilder its movements become. As the holders are forced to catch up with its movements, then enter a trance-like state and the crowd cheers them on. It stops moving if the dukun stops chanting.

Lukah Gilo is played on special occasions and usually at night, when it is thought to be easier to summon spirits.

Warning!
There have been many cases in recent years where players have been allegedly possessed by the spirits they summoned.

The game should always end by dismissing or freeing the spirit from the doll.

If it is left trapped inside, trouble is in store for those who called it....and I'm serious about this...

I'm not encouraged you to do this game, it's not the game one could win....ever.
 
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#50
Woah.... I almost forgot that this thread exist, thanks to Mr. @pleaseforgiveme to reminded me!
Alright, let's see my list.... Pocong? Nah... Kuntilanak? Been there, Kuyang?...hmm not yet....aha! Here it is. Alright *Cough*
....
Do YoU WanT TO plaY a gaME?.....
...


Jelangkung, also called Jailangkung, is an Indonesian game used to communicate with spirits that's more than 1,500 years old.

The game works like this: You draw a circle on a piece of paper, about 20 centimeters in diameter, the write the letters of the alphabet along the rim. You then hold the pen or pencil with the point in the center of the circle. At least two people hold the writing instrument at one time (you can't play this game alone) while another recites the incantation. The specific mantra differs from region to region, but usually goes something like this:

"Jelangkung, Jelangsat, di sini ada pesta, pesta kecil-kecilan. Jelangkung, Jelangsat, datang tak diundang, pulang tak diantar."

In English:

Jelangkung jelangsat, we have a party here, a small party. Jelangkung jelangsat, come uninvited, go undelivered.

Once you feel the spirit arrive, you ask your question and wait for it to move the pen around the letters to spell out an answer.

Traditionally the game was played with a doll made from a coconut shell water dipper and a wooden handle, dressed in human clothes and with a key pendant hung around its neck. At least two people hold the doll while the writing instrument is tied to its hands. The spirit would then occupy the doll.

View attachment 28498
Hey look! It's Chucky's Grandpa!


History....
Jelangkung was first mentioned in an ancient manuscript from the fifth century, which explains exactly the same rules for playing that are used today in Indonesia.

It can be played anywhere but it is most popular in haunted places and around sunset. In the past, people would play on the night of a full moon.

Once the spirit arrived, it would introduce itself and start telling stories.

People would ask questions, such as the name of the spirit, when or how did it died and sometimes about the future or lucky number in gambling.

Origins....
The name Jelangkung comes from an old Chinese belief of the Gods Poyang and Moyang (similarly pronounced with Indonesian term nenek moyang, which means ‘the ancestors’), Cay Lan Gong (literally translated as God of the Vegetable Basket) and Cay Lan Tse (God Protector of the Kids). The game was played by children on the Moon, or Mid-Autumn, festival.

They called on the Gods Poyang and Moyang to enter a vegetable basket doll (used before the water dipper). In the doll’s hand a writing implement, usually chalk, would be inserted. On its neck was hung a necklace with a key pendant. The children would light incense and recite the mantra and when the doll got heavier they knew the spirit had arrived. The doll would nod if it agreed to be questioned and would spell out its answer on a chalkboard.

Before a doll was used, Jelangkung was called Fu Ji, and was played with a tree branch shaped like a “Y”. On person would hold each end of the fork other end would write the answer in sand.

The tradition is closely related to Taoism, in which prophesies are part of daily life.

Versions....
There are plenty of variations of this game!

Cay Lan Gong might have disappeared in China, but the tradition was adapted, passed on and spread wide all over Indonesia. In Java, it is known as Nini Thowong orNini Thowok.

Its ritual is used by adults as well as kids to help protect their village from bad spirits. They would use a compass (as in the geometry tool) and a scarecrow.

In West Sumatra, the Minangkabau people play Lukah Gilo as a form of public entertainment. A shaman called Dukun Lukah directs the ritual as a play and up to four persons have to hold the doll, which is referred to as Lukah Gilo. Lukah is a tool used to capture river fish made out of plaited bamboo and shaped like a vase, and refers to the holders. Gilo means crazy. A basket is used as the doll, with wooden or bamboo hands and a pumpkin or coconut shell head. It is dressed up like a woman.

The dukun recites the mantra over the lukah and it starts to move erraticly. The more the incantation is repeated, the wilder its movements become. As the holders are forced to catch up with its movements, then enter a trance-like state and the crowd cheers them on. It stops moving if the dukun stops chanting.

Lukah Gilo is played on special occasions and usually at night, when it is thought to be easier to summon spirits.

Warning!
There have been many cases in recent years where players have been allegedly possessed by the spirits they summoned.

The game should always end by dismissing or freeing the spirit from the doll.

If it is left trapped inside, trouble is in store for those who called it....and I'm serious about this...

I'm not encouraged you to do this game, it's not the game one could win....ever.
woah i rather not play that game but thanks for inviting me.